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Street view, an 8 bit painted wall animation






The artwork

“Street View” is an original animation realized from a murales, using the stop-motion technique: the scene is continually ri-edited and photographed at regular intervals, and the photos are put together in sequence.
The murales is painted and erased, painted again and covered, and the process continues several times, so as the trace of the different phases of the work lives only in the digital images.
The artwork itself, at the end of the work, presents a double nature: real and virtual. The real dimension is the painted one, because the last scene (the last frame of the video) remains on the wall and is visible to everyone. The virtual dimension is the one presented by the video on the web, that let us see all the phases, also the ones not visible because covered by colour coats, keeping in this way the memory.
The aim is to underline the ephemeral nature of the street artworks, their really short life, covered by other works or ruined by the weather, and the relevance that nowadays have the virtual traces, photos and videos that are more important than the artwork itself, because easier to preserve and see.
As in the previous artwork by Pao (the penguins or the dolphins painted on the urban furniture), a basic element is the shape of the surface: the shape gives the idea and and at the same time is adapted to it.
The wall and its bricks are transformed in a pixel surface, obtaining an original result: an 8-bit scenery constantly modifying is the background of the penguin (a very known character by Pao) adventures.
The video has been realized during the event “Lecco Street View”, curated by Chiara Canali (October 6 th, 11th , 2011, Lecco) and postproduction in Paopao studio, Milan.

The artist

Pao began in 2000 to realize Street art works in Milan, in 2005 founded the Paopao studio (art, design and creativity). In 2007 takes part in the “Street Art Sweet Art” exhibition at PAC, Milan with important Italian street artists, and in the same year began to work also on canvas. Today works with Galleria Prospettive d’Arte, Milan, where in 2010 presented 40 artworks (acrylic on canvas, sculpture and installations) in his first solo-exhibition “Mondotondo”.

Contacts

Official site: www.paopao.it
Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/PaopaoStudio
Link to the video “Street view”: http://youtu.be/mgXZznQEU7U

Paopao Studio
Via G. della Casa, 3
Milan

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